Faculty

 
Dean F. Stauffer

Dean F. Stauffer
Professor of Wildlife

B.S., University of Idaho (1975)
M.S., Iowa State University (1978)
Ph.D., University of Idaho (1983)

Africa

Chihuahua 2005


Academic Interests:

Modeling wildlife-habitat relationships; habitat analysis; habitat assessment and evaluation


Courses Taught:

Wildlife Habitat Ecology and Management
Intro to Renewable Natural Resources
Wildlife Population and Habitat Analysis
Habitat Evaluation Procedures (for USFWS)


Professional Achievements:

Associate Editor, Wildlife Society Bulletin, 1989-1993; College of Forestry & Wildlife Outstanding
Professor, 1993;
Certificate of Teaching Excellence, Virginia Tech, 1994; Chair, The Wildlife Society Working Group on
College and University Education, 1998-present.


Recent Research Projects:

Modeling Biodiversity Response to Land Use Changes (USFWS, USGS, DOD, 1991-2001).
Since 1991 I have had graduate students studying on Quantico Marine Corps Base in Virginia. Previous work has addressed testing a deer-habitat model, collecting baseline vegetation data and building successional models for various habitat characteristics, determining the relationship of birds to habitat patterns on landscapes, and evaluating the effects of silviculture on small mammals. Currently, I am working with a PhD student to develop models that link wildlife-habitat relationships to the existing GIS data bases for Quantico. The goal is to develop a predictive system that will allow resouce managers to assess potential outcomes of various management scenarios on wildlife. We intend to field test the models at Quantico and elsewhere in Virginia to assess the applicability of the system.  

Grouse

Ruffed Grouse Ecology and Management 
(VDGIF, USFWS, USFS, Mellon Foundation, 1996-2003).

In 1996 we initiated a study to assess the impacts of late season hunting on ruffed grouse survival. This project has grown into what is known as the Appalachian Cooperative Grouse Research Project (ACGRP). The ACGRP now includes study sites in KY, OH, PA, MD, WV, VA & NC. We are cooperating with workers from all states and six Universities. We have completed collecting 3 years of baseline data on grouse survival. In fall 1999 hunting was closed on three study sites, and the study will continue for three additional years. This will allow us to experimentally assess the impact of hunting, and the removal of hunting, on grouse populations. In addition to the hunting aspect, various cooperators within the cooperative study are looking at brood survival, hatching success, habitat relationships at different scales, roost site selection and predation. Currently six graduate students have been supported at Virginia Tech on the project.

Cooperative efforts with Kenya (Rockefeller Foundation, World Wildlife Fund, World Bank, 1995 - present).
In my 1998 my student, Enos Esikuri, Defended his dissertation on 'Spatio-temporal effects of land use changes in a savanna wildlife area of Kenya." A direct result of the work with him and others in Kenya is the establishment of a formal exchange savanna wildlife area of Kenya." A direct result of the work with him and others in Kenya is the establishment of a formal exchange agreement between Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya, and Virginia Tech. Under this agreement, we will be able to continue to develop collaborative research projects and set up exchanges for undergraduate students at the two institutions. In fall 1999 we were able to send three students from Virginia Tech to Moi University, and one Virginia Tech student is enrolled at Moi during Spring 2000. We plan to bring a Kenyan student to Virginia Tech in fall 2000. Additionally, Dr. Esikuri and I are working on proposals to secure funding to support long term research in Kenya on the integration of ecological principles into resource planning by communities.

Habitat Evaluation Procedures Training. (1992 - present)
Since 1992 I have been involved with presenting Habitat Evaluation Procedures workshops with the US Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1996 a contract was established between the USGS and Virginia Tech Continuing Education to present HEP workshops. Since that time we have taught 6 classes, and have presented one special 2-week workshop to the Kenya Wildlife Service. We plan to continue to present HEP workshops in the US, and are exploring opportunities to conduct classes in Kenya and South Africa at this time.


Selected Recent Publications:

Stauffer, D. F. In Press. Linking populations and habitats: Where have we been? Where are we going? Pages ##-## in Predicting Species Occurrences: Issues of Scale and Accuracy. Island Press

Penhollow, M. E.*, and D. F. Stauffer. 2000. Large-scale habitat relationships of neotropical migratory birds in Virginia.  Journal of Wildlife Management. 64:362-373.

Fearer, T. M.*, D. F. Stauffer, and R. L. Kirkpatrick. 1999. Relationship of ruffed grouse home range size and movement to landscape characteristics in Southwestern Virginia. Report to Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. May 1999. 96 pp.

Haulton, G. S.*, R. L. Kirkpatrick, and D. F. Stauffer. 1999. Ruffed grouse natality, chick survival, and brood micro-habitat selection in the sourthern Appalachians. Report to Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. June 1999.

Stauffer, D. F., K. J. Hartmann, and T. K. Pauley. 1999. Habitat suitability index models for headwater streams in West Virginia. Report to Arch Coal, Inc. and the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources and Department of Environmental Protection. May 1999. 31pp.

DeLaZerda, Sussy *, and D. F. Stauffer, 1998. Habitat selection by Blackburnian Warblers (Dendroica fusca) wintering in Colombia. Journal of Field Ornithology. 69(3):457-465.

Murray, N. L.*, and D. F. Stauffer. 1995. Nongame bird use of habitat in Central Appalachian riparian forests. Journal of Wildlife Management. 59:78-88


Selected Recent Presentations:

Stauffer, D. F. 1999. Linking populations and habitats: Where have we been? Where are we going? Invited Plenary paper presented at the symposium: Predicting Species Occurrences: Issues of Scale and Accuracy. Snowbird, UT October 1999.

Esikuri, E. E.*, and D. F. Stauffer. 1999. Assessment of elephant damage and mitigation options in Amboseli Basin, Kenya. 2nd International Wildlife Management Congress. Godollo, Hungary.

Haulton, G. S.*, D. F. Stauffer, R. L. Kirkpatrick, and G. W. Norman. 1999. Ruffed grouse brood microhabitat selection in the southern Appalachians. Annual meeting of The Wildlife Society. Austin, TX.

Fearer, T. M.*, D. F. Stauffer, R. L. Kirkpatrick, and G. W. Norman. 1999. Relationship of ruffed grouse home range size and movement to landscape characteristics in southwestern Virginia. Annual Meeting of The Wildlife Society. Austin, TX.

Williams, J. M.*, and D. F. Stauffer. 1999. Habitat use patterns and associations of small mammals in four forest cover types in Virginia. Annual Meeting of The Wildlife Society. Austin, TX.

Esikuri, E. E.*, and D. F. Stauffer. 1999. Elephant, habitat, and human interactions in the Amboseli Basin, Kenya. Annual Meeting of The Wildlife Society. Austin, TX.

Fearer, T. M.*, S. D. Klopfer, and D. F. Stauffer. 1999. Effects of an evergreen understory on gap analysis mapping efforts in the Southern Appalachians. Annual GAP Principal Investigators Meeting, Duluth, MN.

Cheynet, K. I., S. M. Zedaker, R. L. Amateis, and D. F. Stauffer. 1999. Effects of mid-rotation release on forest structure: implications for wildlife habitat and pine yield. Paper presented at the southern Weed Science Society meeting, Greensboro, NC, January, 1999.

 

Last updated August 22, 2005