Faculty

 
Dr. Frimpong

Emmanuel A. Frimpong
Associate Professor of Fisheries Science

B.Sc., University of Science and Technology, Ghana (1997)
M.S., University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (2001)
M.S. (Statistics), Virginia Tech (2009)
Ph.D., Purdue University (2005)

The Frimpong Lab Group


Academic Interests:

Ecology of fishes in fluvial landscapes; macroecology; quantitative ecology; life history-based community and species-habitat modeling; theory and applications of aquatic bioassessment and monitoring; sustainable aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa; freshwater ecosystem conservation planning and policy


Courses Taught:

  • FIW 3514 Fisheries Techniques
  • FIW 4614 Fish Ecology
  • FIW 5984 Life History and Distribution of Fishes
  • FIW 5984 Fluvial Landscape Ecology and Species Distribution Modeling
  • FIW 6984 Linear Modeling and Inference on Ecological Data

Professional Achievements:

Marquis Who’s Who in America 2012 Biographee

Marquis Who’s Who in America 2011 Biographee


Awards/Honors:

CNRE Curriculum Club Teaching Excellence Award for Dept. of Fisheries & Wildlife (2009)
CNRE Curriculum Club Teaching Excellence Award for Dept. of Fisheries & Wildlife (2007)
VT-AFS Outstanding Fisheries Faculty (2009)
VT-AFS Outstanding Fisheries Faculty (2008)
VT-AFS Outstanding Fisheries Faculty (2007)


Recent Activities:

Since 2008, Dr. Frimpong and his team of students and technicians have been conducting field studies in the middle New River basin in Virginia as a model system for studying individual species, fish communities, and human mediated changes in species distributions. It is emerging from these studies that nest association interactions of a mutualistic nature may be one of the key processes by which the cyprinid and centrarchid populations and the community are adapting and persisting in this basin in the face of historical agriculture and current urbanization. Nest association does not only explain persistence and dispersal of species, but also substantially explains the common macroecological phenomenon of rarity and commonness in community organization. The overarching emerging question in this project is how the biotic (e.g., predator abundances) and abiotic (e.g., spawning substrate availability) contexts drive the evolution of the modes of reproduction, strength of nest association, and its fitness consequences for participating species. The lab is now using field experimental studies to investigate the phenomenon of nest association and context dependency, with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Current Research Projects:

2011-2013
Testing the effect of context on a nest association mutualism of stream fishes in a comparative- advantage biological market framework. [Funded by NSF, Division of Environmental Biology, Population and Community Ecology cluster]

2011-2014
Modeling how traits mediate fish vulnerabilities to specific habitat alterations. [Funded by US Geological Survey, Biological Informatics Program]

2010-2013
Enhancing the profitability of small aquaculture operations in Ghana, Kenya, and Tanzania through improved resource management and environmental Best Management Practices (BMPs). [Funded by USAID AquaFish Collaborative Research Support Program (CRSP) through Oregon State University subcontract and collaboration with Purdue University]

2010-2013
Development of assessment tools for evaluating stream and watershed responses to climate change along thermal gradients. [Collaboration with P. L. Angermeier; funded by USDA Forest Service]

2008-2011
Spatial analysis of relations among conservation practices, aquatic biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human well-being in the Albemarle-Pamlico basin, Virginia and North Carolina. [Collaboration with P. L. Angermeier; funded by US Geological Survey]

Recently Completed Research Projects:

Frimpong, E. A., K. K. Quagrainie, S. Amisah, N. W. Agbo, and Gifty Anane-Taabeah. Harnessing the opportunities and overcoming the constraints to widespread adoption of cage aquaculture in Ghana. Final Report submitted to the United States Agency for International Development Aquaculture and Fisheries Collaborative Research Support Program, Corvallis, Oregon, September 2011.

Frimpong, E. A., N. W. Agbo, S. Amisah, E. Tettey, P. Akpaglo, and Gifty Anane-Taabeah. Development and diversification of species for aquaculture in Ghana. Final Report submitted to the United States Agency for International Development Aquaculture and Fisheries Collaborative Research Support Program, Corvallis, Oregon, September 2011.

Frimpong, E. A., Y. B. Ansah, and S. Amisah. Characterization of pond effluents and biological and physicochemical assessment of receiving waters in Ghana. Final Report submitted to the United States Agency for International Development Aquaculture and Fisheries Collaborative Research Support Program, Corvallis, Oregon, November 2009.

Orth, D. J., K. A. Alexander, E. A. Frimpong, W. Henley, and J. R. Voshell. Investigation into smallmouth bass mortality in Virginia’s rivers. Final Report Submitted to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Richmond, VA, September 2009.

Frimpong, E. A., and P. L. Angermeier. Linking traits of at-risk fish species to types of human impact: a test of concept. Final report submitted to US Geological Survey National Aquatic Gap/National Biological Information Infrastructure, Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Unit, Reston, VA, September 2009.


Publications:

Ansah, Y. B., E. A. Frimpong, and S. Amisah. (Accepted). Biological assessment of aquaculture effects on effluent-receiving streams in Ghana using structural and functional composition of fish and macroinvertebrate assemblages. Environmental Management.

Alexander, K. A., J. K. Blackburn, and E. A. Frimpong. 2011. Buffalo and Maslow’s hammer. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 9:302-303 + web appendix.

McManamay, R. A., D. J. Orth, C. A. Dollof, and E. A. Frimpong. 2011. Regional frameworks applied to hydrology: can landscape-based frameworks capture the hydrologic variability? River Research and Applications. DOI: 10.1002/rra.1535.

McManamay, R. A., D. J. Orth, C. A. Dollof, and E. A. Frimpong. 2011. A regional classification of unregulated stream flows: spatial resolution and hierarchical frameworks. River Research and Applications 26:1-26. DOI: 10.1002/rra.1493

Peoples, B. K., and E. A. Frimpong. 2011. Among-pass, interregional, and single- versus multiple-season comparisons of detection probabilities of stream fishes. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 140(1):67-83. DOI: 10.1080/00028487.2010.550237.

Peoples, B. K., M. B. Tainer, and E. A. Frimpong. 2010. Bluehead chub nesting activity: a potential mechanism of population persistence in degraded stream habitats. Environmental Biology of Fishes 90(4):379-391 DOI: 10.1007/s10641-010-9748-0

Pritt, J. J., and E. A. Frimpong. 2010. Quantitative determination of rarity of freshwater fishes and implications for imperiled-species designations. Conservation Biology 24(5):1249-1258.

Frimpong, E. A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2010. Comparative utility of selected frameworks for regionalizing fish-based bioassessments across the United States. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 139:1872-1895.

Frimpong, E. A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2010. Trait-based approaches in the analysis of stream fish communities. American Fisheries Society Symposium 73:109-136.

Frimpong, E. A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: A database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34(10):487-495.

Haas, C. A., E. A. Frimpong, and S. M. Karpanty. 2009. Ecosystems and ecosystem-based management: Introduction to ecosystem properties and processes. Chapter 6 in K. Moore, editor. Innovating for Agriculture and Natural Resources Management. SANREM-CRSP, Soil and Water Conservation Society, Ankeny.

Hrodey, P. J., T. M. Sutton, E. A. Frimpong, and T. P. Simon. 2009. Land-use impacts on watershed health and integrity in Indiana warmwater streams. American Midland Naturalist 161:76-95.

Roberts, J. H., and E. A. Frimpong. 2009. The extensive and complex landscape of fisheries related journals. Fisheries 34(3):143-144.

Frimpong, E. A., J. G. Lee, and A. L. Ross-Davis. 2007. Floodplain influence on the cost of riparian buffers and implications for conservation programs. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 62(1):33-39.

Sutton, T.M., R. A. Zeiber, and E. A. Frimpong. 2006. Developing an effective resume or curriculum vitae. Chapter 2 in D. A. Hewitt, W. E. Pine III, and A. V. Zale, editors. An American Fisheries Society guide to fisheries employment, 2nd ed. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.

Frimpong, E. A., J. G. Lee, and T. M. Sutton. 2006. Cost effectiveness of vegetative filter strips and in-stream half-logs for ecological restoration. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 42(5):1349-1361.

Frimpong, E. A., A. L. Ross-Davis, J. G. Lee, and S. R. Broussard. 2006. Biophysical and socioeconomic factors explaining the extent of forest cover on private ownerships in a Midwest (USA) agrarian landscape. Landscape Ecology 21(5):763-776.

Frimpong, E. A., and S. E. Lochmann. 2006. An evaluation of the effect of treatments for pond water reuse on zooplankton populations. North American Journal of Aquaculture 68(1):103-109.

Frimpong, E. A., T. M. Sutton, B. A. Engel, and T. P. Simon. 2005. Spatial-scale effects on relative importance of physical habitat predictors of stream health. Environmental Management 36(6):899-917.

Frimpong, E. A., T. M. Sutton, K. J. Lim, P. J. Hrodey, B. Engel, T. P. Simon, J. G. Lee, and D. C. Le Master. 2005. Determination of optimal riparian forest buffer dimensions for stream biota–landscape association models using multimetric and multivariate responses. Canadian Journal of Fisheries & Aquatic Sciences 62(1):1-6.

Frimpong, E. A., and S. E. Lochmann. 2005. Mortality of fish larvae exposed to varying concentrations of cyclopoid copepods. North American Journal of Aquaculture 67(1):66-71.

Frimpong, E. A., S. E. Lochmann, M. Bodary, and N. Stone. 2004. Suspended solids from baitfish pond effluents in drainage ditches. Journal of the World Aquaculture Society 35(2):159-166.

Frimpong, E. A., S. E. Lochmann, and N. M. Stone. 2003. Application of a methodology for surveying and comparing prevalence of drainage ditches to baitfish farms. North American Journal of Aquaculture 65(2):165-170.

To Appear Soon
Deweber, J. T., and E. A. Frimpong. A Land cover distinguished physiographic regionalization explains differential fish assemblage responses to land use.

Frimpong, E. A. ‘Vital traits’: A meta-analysis of the geometry of life-history trait associations and tradeoffs in fishes.

Frimpong, E. A. Mode of reproduction and dispersal predict rare-common patterns in species abundance curves of cyprinid fishes.

Frimpong, E. A., and M. L. Henebry. Short-term effects of formalin and ethanol preservation techniques on weight and diameter of fish eggs.

Frimpong, E. A., and J. J. Pritt. Biological traits that predict rarity of freshwater fishes.

Pendleton, R. M., J. J. Pritt, B. K. Peoples, and E. A. Frimpong. The strength of Nocomis nest associations contributes to patterns of rarity versus commonness among New River, Virginia, cyprinids.

Peoples, B. K., and E. A. Frimpong. Mutual benefits of nest association among freshwater cyprinids: empirical evidence of potential mechanisms with implications for community organization.

Peoples, B. K., and E. A. Frimpong. A snapshot analysis of age structure of lithophilic fishes in urban and forested reaches of tributaries of the New River, Virginia.

Pritt, J. J., and E. A. Frimpong. The effect of sampling intensity on observed rarity of stream fish and fish-based assessment metrics.

Pritt, J. J., and E. A. Frimpong. Factors explaining diffusive rarity in stream fishes.

Yaw, B., E. A. Frimpong, and S. Amisah. Characterization of potential pond effluents and physico-chemical assessment of effluent-receiving streams in Ghana.


The Frimpong Lab Group of Graduate and Undergraduate Research Students and Some Representative Activities

Group photo

The Crew...

The Crew in the field

…investigates the ecology and land use effects on

fish communities in the New River basin,…

Stream in Ghana

…assesses aquaculture effluent-receiving streams in Ghana,…


Graduate Students

…works for big food and sustainability of

aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa,…

example model

…models landscapes and land use dynamics,…

lab members

...and takes a break!


Graduate Students and Their Research:

Yaw B. Ansah
Yaw B. Ansah

Yaw B. Ansah
Borlaug LEAP Fellow

PhD
August 2010-

Dissertation: Enhancing the profitability and sustainability of aquaculture in Ghana through improved natural resources management and environmental BMPs

MS
August 2008-May 2010
Thesis:
Characterization of pond effluents and biological and physico-chemical assessment of receiving waters in Ghana


Gifty Anane-Taabeah
Gifty Anane-Taabeah

Gifty Anane-Taabeah
PEO International Women’s Peace Fellow

MS
January 2010-
Thesis: Harnessing the opportunities and overcoming the constraints to widespread adoption of cage aquaculture in Ghana


J. Deweber
J. Deweber

Jefferson T. Deweber

MS
August 2008-May 2010
Thesis: The role of physiography in the relationships between land cover and stream fish assemblages


L. Henebry
L. Henebry

M. Lee Henebry

MS
August 2008-June 2011
Thesis: Biological and ecological trait associations and analysis of spatial and intraspecific variation in fish traits


B. Peoples
B. Peoples

Brandon Peoples

PhD
August 2011-

Dissertation: Reproductive and community ecology and conservation of cyprinids

MS
January 2008-December 2009
Thesis: Detection probabilities and local population demographics of fishes in urbanized and forested streams of the New River basin, Virginia


J. Pritt
J. Pritt

Jeremy J. Pritt

MS
January 2008-May 2010
Thesis: Defining rarity and determining the mechanisms of rarity for North American freshwater fishes