Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
 

Pat Scanlon Memorial Dedicated

Image of Dr. Scanlon

Pat Scanlon was born in Athlone, Ireland in 1941. He received his doctorate from the National University of Ireland. He began as an assistant professor at Virginia Tech in 1971 and worked here for 32 years. He became internationally recognized for research on physiology and toxicology of animals in the wild. He collaborated with scientists from around the world. He mentored 6 Ph.D. students, 25 M.S. students, and scores of undergraduates. He was regarded as an excellent teacher of courses in wildlife field biology, vertebrate pest management, and wildlife physiology, toxicology and nutrition. Dr. Scanlon authored over 250 scientific articles and presented over 400 talks at scientific meetings. He offered outstanding service to Virginia Tech, perhaps most notably as an officer in the Faculty Senate and on numerous commissions and committees. He offered outstanding service to science through his efforts with the Wildlife Society, the Society for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Sigma Xi, and the Virginia Academy of Science. Pat Scanlon died unexpectedly while on a field project in Taiwan with a graduate student and colleagues. His loss from our community cannot be filled. Dr. Scanlon was an esteemed faculty member, and was awarded Professor Emeritus status posthumously, an unusual award.

The College and Natural Resources, the Scanlon family, and many friends dedicated a memorial to Pat Scanlon on May 5, 2007. After welcoming remarks from Dean J. Michael Kelly, family members expressed their appreciation for the support of friends expressed at the dedication. Department Head Eric Hallerman summarized Pat’s career, and colleagues Mike Vaughan and Roy Kirkpatrick shared stories about “Paddy”.

Image of Mike Vaughan

Mike Vaughan tells stories of Pat Scanlon to

those assembled for the dedication.

Scanlon's at the Monument

Dr. Scanlon’s mentee, Po-Jen Chiang, poses with the

Scanlon family at the memorial.

The Monument

The memorial plaque is from colleagues in Taiwan,

and shows the field party hiking

up a mountain with its wild animals.